Learning Center
If you would like to learn more about your system, please look through our learning center for more information.

Why should I choose AbleAir-1, Inc. to be my contractor?
Because we are one of the few qualified service contractors.
See About Us for more information.

Q Why should I have regular maintenance checkups?
A See Maintenance for more information.

Q What is BTU?
BTU (British thermal unit) is a measure of thermal heat energy. One BTU is the amount of energy required to raise the temperature of one pound of water, one degree Fahrenheit. To heat or cool your house, heat should be removed or added to the conditioned space and this heat is measured in BTU.

Q What is CFM?
A CFM is cubic feet per minute of air. It is important to have the right CFM to properly heat, cool, humidify and dehumidify the condition space.

Q What is a Dual Fuel System?
A Dual fuel System is combination of heat pump and fossil fuel furnace, where the heat pump operates at moderate outside temperature 40F and above and automatically switches to fossil fuel at colder temperatures. Dual fuel is the most efficient system.

Q What is Carbon Monoxide
A It’s a poisonous gas.
See Carbon Monoxide for more information.

Q What is Freon?
A Refrigerant (Freon) is a chemical, colorless, odorless, noncorrosive and nonflammable gas or liquid with lower boiling points and have the ability to absorb heat without drastic expansion in volume.

Q What is SEER?
A Seasonal energy efficiency ratio SEER; it measures how efficiently a cooling system will operate over an entire season.
See AC and Heat Pumps for more information.

Q What is HSPF?
A Heating Season Performance Factor (HSPF)
The HSPF is a measure of the overall heating efficiency of a heat pump. HSPF is similar to SEER, but it measures the efficiency of heat pump in the heating cycle. See Heat Pumps for more information.

Q What is AFUE?
A AFUE (Annual fuel utilization efficiency)

Q Why my A/C system is icing up?
A There are many reasons for a system to ice up. An AC system absorbs heat from inside of the house and rejects it outside, but this process can only be accomplished when there is proper air flow and refrigerant charge in the system. When one or both of these conditions fail to exist it will cause a lack of heat transfer which leads to low pressure and a low temperature coil (pressure goes down temperature goes down and vice versa.) For this reason, at lower temperatures, ice starts forming on the evaporator coil and refrigerant line set. The followings are some causes:

Dirty air filter or evaporator coil, blower is not performing properly, under sized duct system, low refrigerant charge due to leak in the system and etc.




































Q What is HVAC class A contractor?
A It’s a State issued license, "HVAC contractors" (Abbr: HVA), which certifies those individuals whose work includes the installation, alteration, repair, or maintenance of heating systems, ventilating systems, cooling systems, steam and hot water heaters, boilers, process piping, and mechanical refrigeration systems, including tanks incidental to the system. This classification does not provide for fire suppression installations, sprinkler system installations, or gas piping. A firm holding a HVAC license is responsible for meeting all applicable tradesman licensure standards. This classification may install backflow prevention devices incidental to work in this classification. Locally issued business licenses are not considered a contractor license and to take on a contract under such license solely is a violation of state and local contracting laws.

Q What is an EPA Certification?
A The ozone layer lies approximately 10-25 miles above the Earth's surface, in the stratosphere. Depletion of this layer by ozone depleting substances (ODS) mainly refrigerants that contains chlorine will lead to higher ultraviolet (UVB) levels, which in turn will cause increased skin cancers and cataracts and potential damage to some marine organisms, plants, and plastics. Therefore to protect the earth we live in from harmful UVB rays the EPA established regulations requires that technicians become certified. Technicians who repair or service, install refrigerant contained equipment must be trained and certified by an EPA-approved section 608 program. After completing a required training program, technicians must pass a test to become certified.

Q What is a NATE Certification?
A North American Technician Excellence or NATE is the nation’s largest non-profit certification organization for heating, ventilation, AC and refrigeration technicians. The U.S. Department of Energy endorses NATE.

Q What is a HVAC Master License?
A Is a state Issued license to qualify individuals who fulfill the education and experience and good practices in HVAC field and take designated exam with passing score, a firm with an experienced master is eligible to take the state contractor license exam.

Q What is a Gasfitter license?
A It’s a state Issued license to qualify individuals who fulfill the education and experience and good practices in Gasfitter field and take the designated exam with a passing score. A firm with an experienced master is eligible to take the state contractor license exam.






Q What is a business license?
A Issued by locality to do business and establish a name and entity to operate under. It does not substitute as a contractor license.

Q What is a service call?
A A service call is a fee to hire a technician to come to your house to diagnose the problem. There used to be a few companies in the industry a few years back that offered “free service call.” This offer really is not possible due to all of the costs of overhead involved, such as gas and pay to name a couple. So when a company advertises “Free Service Call,” most of the time, they factor it into the repair cost. While you might see a zero in that column of the bill, just know that it was calculated and added in another way, because it is impossible to honestly offer that.

Q What is Flat rate?
A It’s an upfront reasonable flat repair cost that we quote which includes part and labor. We do not Sit there and charge you hour after hour.

Q What is after hour Charge?
A When you hire a technician other than our normal business hours, there will be an increase in service rates and the reason is because we pay our technician over time.

Q Why should I replace my Evaporator coil when I replace my condensing unit?
A You should replace them both because if your older coil and condensing unit are rated at 8 to 10 SEER efficiency, replacing just the condensing unit with a 13 SEER (minimum efficiency rating required by law) Condensing unit still leave you with a 8-10 SEER rated coil. This means a couple things. First, you are paying for a more efficient system but you can’t receive that efficiency because your coil isn’t able to achieve it. Second, since you aren’t able to reach that efficiency for your system, you aren’t able to save the money on your energy bill that you could’ve been receiving. Another good reason to replace them at the same time is because you will receive a better deal if you replace them together versus individually.

Q
Why I need a humidifier?
A As the outside temperature drops in winter, it will decrease moisture in the air which will cause a lot of problems including static electricity shocks, dry skin, dry nasal passages, dry eyes, flu symptoms, cracked wood work, and cracked drywall. A humidifier will add moisture in your house which will not only reduce the above problems, but it will also save you money on your energy bills as well because with higher humidity one can feel comfortable at lower temperatures, thus enabling you to turn the thermostat a few degrees lower.

Q How do I know which system is right for my house?
AWe will discuss your comfort concerns and needs first, emphasizing what is important to you and your family. Then one of our comfort experts will give you a recommendation on the right system for your home.

Q What can I do to reduce my utility bills?
A There are many ways to lower your utility bills including Regular Maintenance to make sure your system is running to its specified capacity, replacing your air filter regularly, installing a Humidifier and dehumidifier, and installing programmable thermostat.

Q Why should I do a leak search when my system is low on refrigerant?
A Our first reason is because of our environment. Most refrigerants used today contain Chlorine, which scientists have found, destroys the ozone layer, thus allowing harmful UVB rays pass increasing skin cancer, cataracts, as well as marine and plant destruction. Second your system loses its capacity as refrigerant leaks out thus disabling it from properly removing heat from your home. This also translates to higher energy bills. If a system can’t remove the amount of heat it needs to, then it will operate longer in order to satisfy. Low refrigerant or leaking system can lead to compressor failure as well. You also have to pay each time you recharge your system.

Q What is Hybrid system?
A Hybrid is a system that works on duel fuels (Freon and Fossil fuel) a heat pump in conjunction with a fossil fuel furnace. On moderate outside temperatures the heat pump will operate at lower energy consumption and on a few colder days the high efficient fossil fuel furnace will be in operation. We continue to install them because our customers love it.

Q Can I do maintenance on my system?
A Yes, keep the air filter clean. But you should consider having a professional from AbleAir check all the parts on your system to insure they are all operating properly. These include safeties, carbon monoxide, gas leaks, Freon levels, lubrication and most of all to make sure your system is operating up to its capacity, which requires expert skills and tools. Link to maintenance page.

Q What is an Air Cleaner?
A An Air cleaner is a filtering system which cleans the air in your home, capturing and destroying most air borne allergens and common bacteria from your home. Link to Air cleaners
































Q Why does my house feel humid in summer?
A Dirty evaporator coil, dirty blower motor, restricted return, not proper drainage, over sized system.

Q Why are there cold and hot spots (uneven Temperature) in my house?
A There are many factors which contribute to this problem. This includes the duration of heat gain from the sun due to the location of some rooms in the house, duct run and sizing, leaky air ducts and HVAC equipment sizing.

Q Who should I call when I smell gas?
A Do not switch any lights get everyone out of the house and using a telephone outside call your Gas Company, and/or call AbleAir-1 Inc.

Q What should I set my thermostat at in summer?
A In summer 75 to 78F and in winter 70 to 72F, but it all depends on each individual. Make sure it’s not too low or you could have mold problems. A Cold house can attract moisture from outside warmer temperature while also leaving you to pay higher utility bills.

Q What Makes R-410A a Better Refrigerant?
A It's Environmentally Friendlier. If your system ever leaks, the escaping refrigerant won't contribute to ozone depletion!

Q How could CFCs and HCFCs Affect the Ozone Layer?
A Ozone is constantly being made in our atmosphere, mostly by collisions of oxygen molecules (O2) and oxygen atoms (O). Ozone is also constantly being destroyed by similar collisions between O3 molecules and O atoms, resulting in pairs of O2 molecules. In theory then, there is a balance between creation and destruction that results in a constant layer of ozone.

The full names for CFCs and HCFCs are Chlorofluorocarbons and Hydrochlorofluorocarbons. CFC molecules are made of chlorine, fluorine, and carbon, and HCFC molecules also have hydrogen atoms attached. The widely accepted theory of ozone depletion is that these molecules, once emitted to the atmosphere, eventually are broken down over long periods of time into their individual atoms. The chlorine atoms then react with the ozone and cause ozone destruction to happen faster than ozone creation.

Q Why is Ozone Depletion Considered Bad?
A Because stratospheric ozone protects us from harmful ultraviolet rays, ozone depletion means people, animals and plants are all affected by these rays when the ozone layer fails to stop them.





This may include:
AbleAir-1 Inc.• Increases in skin cancers
• Increases in cataracts of the eyes which can result in loss of sight
• Reduction in the yields of important food crops, according to some scientists


Avoid the Risk that R-22 could become expensive or difficult to get When your system needs to be repaired in a few Years!

The old refrigerant R-22 will be phased out along with other ozone depleting chemicals, and both supply and demand of this chemical will be significantly affected by current and upcoming regulations. By selecting an air conditioner or heat pump that uses R-410A, you will avoid the risk associated with purchasing a product that is destined to become obsolete.

R-410A Systems Can be More Reliable than R-22 Systems:
R-410A air conditioners and heat pumps are today's "state of the art" systems, and utilize the most current technology available for efficient and reliable operation. The heart of every air conditioner or heat pump is the compressor, and newer systems are specifically designed to use R-410A refrigerant. They often incorporate smaller, heavier-duty "scroll-type" compressors that are quieter and operate with less damaging vibration than older compressors that operate on R-22. Since R-410A can absorb and release heat more efficiently than R-22 ever could, compressors with R-410A run cooler than R-22 systems, reducing the risk of burnout due to overheating.

It Uses a Synthetic Lubricant that Helps to Keep the System Operating Smoothly
All air-conditioning systems use an oil that circulates through the inside of the system to keep all of the parts well lubricated, just like the engine of your car. R-22 air conditioners use an oil known as "mineral oil" that has been used for decades. R-410A air conditioners use newer synthetic lubricants that are usually more soluble with the R-410A than the old mineral oils are with the older R-22 refrigerants. This means the synthetic lubricants and R-410A can mix and circulate more efficiently to keep the compressor and other moving parts lubricated, reducing wear and extending their life. Also, just as many new cars use synthetic oils because they are less likely to break down under high stress and heat, the new synthetic oils used in R-410A air conditioners are less likely to break down under extreme conditions.

Q Why must we replace air filters?
A AC equipment is designed to operate with a specific quantity of air passing over its indoor coil surface. When air filters are not replaced, they clog and become coated with dirt. Similarly, the indoor coils get coated with dirt. This dirt reduces the amount of air through the unit below the design limit, leading to catastrophic failure.

In the cooling mode, if there is not enough air over the indoor coil, the coil temperature drops. When it drops below the freezing point, ice forms on the coil which reduces airflow and coil temperature. The compressor within the unit is a pump, which is designed to pump vapor. As the airflow through the indoor coil drops, there isn't enough heat being removed from the air passing over the coil to vaporize the liquid refrigerant inside the coil. Thus, instead of receiving a vapor, the compressor receives liquid refrigerant. This is called "liquid slugging". The effect of "liquid slugging" is similar to the effect of pouring liquid into the cylinders of a gas engine. As liquids are not compressible, cylinder pressure exceeds the design limits of the cylinder and the valves, connecting rods, pistons, or other internal components are destroyed. The units start out requiring that its filters be replaced. Now it needs a new compressor.

In the heating mode, low airflow causes the heat exchanger to overheat.  Heat exchangers are designed to operate at temperature between 120°F and 200°F.  At higher temperatures, the heat exchanger oxidizes, its life-span is reduced, or it cracks and breaks. In either case, it makes far more sense to replace air filters regularly than to replace a heat exchanger costing far more.

Q Why must we replace drive belts? (Usually Commercial)
A Loose or broken drive belts cause the same problems that dirty filters cause. They cause the airflow through the equipment to be reduced below design limits. In addition, loose drive belts slip on the pulleys. This wears the groove in the pulley so that when the belt is replaced, the new belt is ruined in a short period of time by the worn pulleys. Once again replace the belt on a regular basis or spend much more replacing pulleys.


Q Why must we clean condenser coils?
A Equipment is designed to operate between certain outdoor temperature limits. Cooling and condensing of the refrigerant vapor is designed to occur with a particular volume of air flowing through the condenser at a maximum outdoor ambient temperature (Usually 115°F). If the finned surfaces of the outdoor coils are filled with dirt, the ability of these coils to transfer heat is reduced and the airflow through the condenser coil is reduced. When the ability to transfer heat is reduced, the operating temperatures and pressures of the unit increase. A unit, designed to operate at ambient temperatures of 115°F or more, may stop operating at an outdoor temperature of 90°F. Due to the reduced heat transfer capability, the operating temperatures and pressures within the unit exceed the manufacturer's safe limit and the unit shuts down. If the unit does not exceed the manufacturer's limits by enough to shut down, it will continue to run at reduced capacity and efficiency, and at an increased rate of wear due to the increased work load.

Q Why must we clean evaporator coils?
A Refrigerant absorbs heat from the air in your house through evaporator coil and conveys it outside. In addition, it extracts humidity from the air and drains it in form of condensation.

AC equipment is designed to operate with a specific quantity of air passing over its indoor coil surface. When air filters are not replaced, they clog and become coated with dirt. Similarly, over time the indoor coils get coated with dirt, which reduces airflow leading to catastrophic failures.


In the cooling mode, if there is not enough air over the indoor coil, the coil temperature drops. When it drops below the freezing point, ice forms on the coil, which further reduces the airflow and coil temperature. The compressor within the unit is a pump, which is designed to pump vapor. As the airflow through the indoor coil drops, there isn't enough heat being removed from the air passing over the coil to vaporize the liquid refrigerant inside the coil. Thus, instead of receiving a vapor, the compressor receives liquid refrigerant. This is called "liquid slugging". The effect of "liquid slugging" is similar to the effect of pouring liquid into the cylinders of a gas engine. As liquids are not compressible, cylinder pressure exceeds the design limits, of the cylinder, and the valves, connecting rods, pistons, or other internal components are destroyed. The units start out requiring that its filters be replaced. Now it needs a new compressor.

In the heating mode, low airflow causes the heat exchanger to overheat.  Heat exchangers are designed to operate at certain temperature. At higher temperatures, the heat exchanger oxidizes, its life-span is reduced, or it cracks and breaks. In either case, it makes far more sense to have your system checked regularly than to replace a heat exchanger costing far more.

Q Why must we clean burners?
A Burners are designed to operate in conjunction with spuds and gas valve to provide a certain amount of heat.

Lack of proper combustion air, improper gas supply to the burners and dust drawn with air into the combustion chamber while operating will cause the burners to get partially or completely clogged over time, which leads to gas odor, carbon monoxide, longer operating time during the heat cycle, insufficient flame, and higher energy consumption.

Q Why must we flush drain line and clean drain pan?
A During air condition operation, the evaporator coil will extract humidity from the air passing through it, which will be drained in form of condensation through drain pan and drain line. The drain line and drain pan get clogged over time and when it clogs the pan overflows, which leads to water leaking around and into the unit. This may cause electrical, mechanical and water damage. A dirty drain line and drain pan is also a good environment for molds to grow in.

Q Why must we clean blower motor and blower wheel?
A During cooling and heating operation dirty motor and/or wheel cause less air flow which will lead to inefficient operation, higher energy consumption, blower motor and other major failures, dusty space and health related issues.

Q Why Inspect Relays and Contactors?
A Electrical relays are designed to open and close a certain number of times with a particular current load, before the contact points are damaged and relay requires replacement. If more than the design current is passed through this relay due to a motor working too hard, or low voltage conditions, the contact points overheat and become damaged. If the electrical contacts in a contactor (large relay) begin to get pitted, and the contactor is not replaced, eventually the compressor motor or the fan motor controlled by the contactor will burn up and require replacement. Once again, if we exceed the design limitations of the device, or its anticipated life span, additional damage is caused.











Q Why Must We Lubricate Bearings and Rotating Components?
A Bearings and other rotating parts are designed to have a useful life span of hundreds of thousands of hours, provided they are lubricated at appropriate intervals and are not overloaded due to vibration from defective drive belts or dirty blower wheels. If bearings are not lubricated regularly, they will overheat and seize. When this occurs, the bearings fall apart, and the blower wheel, shaft, and housing are destroyed. This is a prime example of a situation where inexpensive maintenance was neglected with catastrophic results.

Q Why Must We Check the Refrigerant Charge on a Regular Basis?
A A unit operating with an insufficient refrigerant charge can ruin its compressor via two scenarios. The unit icing up due to a low-pressure condition causes the first type of failure, causing the compressor to fail due to liquid slugging, as described before. The second type of failure is due to the fact that the compressor requires a certain quantity of cool refrigerant vapor to cool its motor windings. If the refrigerant charge is not sufficient, the motor within the compressor will overheat and burn up.

Q How an Air Conditioner Works?
A Taken literally, AC includes the cooling and heating of air, cleaning it and controlling its moisture level: conditioning it to provide maximum indoor comfort. An air conditioner transfers heat from the inside of a building, where it is not wanted, to the outside. Refrigerant in the system absorbs the excess heat and is pumped through a closed system of piping to an outside coil. A fan blows outside air over the hot coil, transferring heat from the refrigerant to the outdoor air. Because the heat is removed from the indoor air, the indoor area is cooled. An AC system generally consists of five mechanical components:

AbleAir-1 Inc.1. A compressor
2. A fan
3. A condenser coil (hot)
4. An evaporator coil (cool)
5. A chemical refrigerant





Most central AC systems include of a "hot" side, outside your home, and a "cold" side, inside your home. The "hot" side generally consists of a condensing coil, a compressor and a fan.

The "cold" side is usually located within your furnace. The furnace blows air through an evaporator coil, which cools the air, and routes this cool air throughout your home using a series of air ducts.

The cleaning function of air conditioners is performed by filters, which remove dust from the air.

Central Air Conditioners:
Central air conditioners circulate cool air through a system of supply and return ducts. Supply ducts and registers (i.e., openings in the walls, floors, or ceilings covered by grills) carry cooled air from the air conditioner to the home. This cooled air becomes warmer as it circulates through the home; then it flows back to the central air conditioner through return ducts and registers.
Air conditioners help to dehumidify the incoming air, but in extremely humid climates or in cases where the air conditioner is oversized, it may not achieve a low humidity. Running a dehumidifier in your air conditioned home will increase your energy use, both for the dehumidifier itself and because the air conditioner will require more energy to cool your house.

Types of Central Air Conditioners:
A central air conditioner is either a split-system unit or a packaged unit.
In a split-system central air conditioner, an outdoor metal cabinet contains the condenser and compressor, and an indoor cabinet contains the evaporator. In many split-system air conditioners, this indoor cabinet also contains a furnace or the indoor part of a heat pump. The air conditioner's evaporator coil is installed in the cabinet or main supply duct of this furnace or heat pump. If your home already has a furnace but no air conditioner, a split-system is the most economical central air conditioner to install.

In a packaged central air conditioner, the evaporator, condenser, and compressor are all located in one cabinet, which usually is placed on a roof or on a concrete slab next to the house's foundation. This type of air conditioner also is used in small commercial buildings. Air supply and return ducts come from indoors through the home's exterior wall or roof to connect with the packaged air conditioner, which is usually located outdoors. Packaged air conditioners often include electric heating coils or a natural gas furnace. This combination of air conditioner and central heater eliminates the need for a separate furnace indoors.

Q How a Heat Pump Works?
A Heat Pump Systems

Heat Pump Systems:
For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into your warm house; during the cooling season, heat pumps move heat from your cool house into the warm outdoors. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to 4 times the amount of energy they consume.

The most common type of heat pump is the air-source heat pump, which transfers heat between your house and the outside air. If you heat with electricity, a heat pump can trim the amount of electricity you use for heating by as much as 30%–40%. High-efficiency heat pumps also dehumidify better than standard central air conditioners, resulting in less energy usage and more cooling comfort in summer months. However, the efficiency of most air-source heat pumps as a heat source drops dramatically at low temperatures, generally making them unsuitable for cold climates, although there are systems that can overcome that problem.


























Air-Source Heat Pumps:
An air-source heat pump can provide efficient heating and cooling for your home, especially if you live in a warm climate. When properly installed, an air-source heat pump can deliver one-and-a-half to three times more heat energy to a home than the electrical energy it consumes. This is possible because a heat pump moves heat rather than converting it from a fuel, like in combustion heating systems.

Although air-source heat pumps can be used in nearly all parts of the United States, they do not generally perform well over extended periods of sub-freezing temperatures. In regions with sub-freezing winter temperatures, it may not be cost effective to meet all your heating needs with a standard air-source heat pump.
However, new systems with gas heating as a backup are able to overcome this problem. There is also a "Cold Climate Heat Pump" which shows promise, but is currently facing manufacturing problems. In addition, a version called the "Reverse Cycle Chiller" claims to be able to operate efficiently at below-freezing temperatures.



A heat pump is like a conventional air conditioner except it also can provide heat in winter. In the summer, the heat pump collects heat from the house and expels it outside. In the winter, the heat pump extracts heat from outside air and circulates it inside the house. The heat pump works best when the outdoor temperature is above freezing. Below that, supplementary heat often is needed. A heat pump can save 30 to 60 percent less energy to supply the same heat when compared to an electric furnace with a resistance heating element.

Cooling Cycle:
Refrigerant passes through the indoor coil, evaporating from a liquid to a vapor. As the liquid evaporates, it absorbs heat, cooling the air around the coil. An indoor fan pushes this cooled air through ducts inside the house. Meanwhile, the vaporized refrigerant laden with heat passes through a compressor which compresses the vapor, raising its temperature and pressure. The reversing valve directs the flow of hot, high pressure vapor to the outdoor coil where the heat released during condensation is fanned into the outdoor air, and the cycle begins again.


Heating Cycle:
The reversing valve in the outdoor unit shifts, causing the refrigerant flow to reverse. Liquid refrigerant now flows to the outdoor coil picking up heat as it evaporates into a low pressure vapor. The vapor travels through the compressor where it is compressed into a hot, high pressure vapor, then is directed by the reversing valve to the indoor coil. The vapor turns into liquid as it passes through the indoor coil, releasing heat that is pushed through the ducts by the indoor fan.

Furnace Operation:
The room thermostat calls for heat when the conditioned space's temperature falls below the set point. After all safeties are tested through an integrated solid state circuit board, including the ignition and flue system, the flammable gas through the electrical combination gas valve will be released into the burners for ignition. After a short delay, the blower comes on and pushes the low temperature return air from the conditioned space across the heat exchanger and through the supply ducts where the warm air will be vented into the rooms. Meanwhile, the products of combustion will be exhausted outside through the flue system and the cycle will repeat each time there is a call for heat.



Q What form of payment you accept?
A We accept all major forms of payment including Checks, Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover and Cash. We also accept cash and with installations, we also provide financing options.

Q Do you protect the floors during installation?
A Yes we do. We are always very careful of our surroundings and our installers always put down water resistant drop cloths on the floors and carpets to make sure they remain clean and unharmed.



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